Projects

Posted September 20, 2020

VIDEO OF LIVE PERFORMANCE WITHOUT MAX AUDIO

Recording of Max Audio from live performance. Created for PIMA 7741 on September 20, 2020

Posted September 20, 2020

FAILED LIVE MAX PERFORMANCE AUDIO TEST IN OBS

Created for PIMA 7741 on September 18, 2020

Posted September 10, 2020

ODS/MAX PATCH CLIP

Created for PIMA 7741 on September 10, 2020

Posted September 4, 2020

AUDACITY LIVE RECORDING/STEREO CLIP

Created for PIMA 7741 on September 3, 2020.

Please do not reproduce any of the content on this site without the expressed written consent of Temar France.

A Recipe For Wellness

Directed by Temar France and Lillie Lapeyrolerie

A Recipe for Wellness (2017) follows a group of two student activists as they organize mutual aid in the aftermath of the 2017 U.S. presidential election. This political moment in all its violence and absurdity aggravated already fraught racial tensions on the student’s campus. With little to no resources supporting the psychological and emotional well-being of Black students on their predominantly white college campus, the students began dreaming up ways of practicing care and community for each other.

Please do not reproduce any of the content on this site without the expressed written consent of Temar France.

Analog Erotic, 2018

Analog Erotic is a visual essay and study of Black women’s erotic histories within the United States through the careful examination of the “video vixen”, a popular black erotic figure of the 1990s and early 2000s hip-hop (print) culture. This project attempts to expand upon Audre Lorde’s thinking in The Uses of the Erotic and her conviction that because the erotic is often conflated with the pornographic, we overlook its potential as a source of power and information.

Working from this erotic capacity, Analog Erotic considers the source of affective power in Black visual erotica and problematizes Lorde’s dismissal of pornographic visualities as disempowering or removed from the possibility of sexual pleasure or agency.

I share this project as an early attempt in my studies to consider what shapes the popular discourse on black women’s sexual lives, and I hope that it encourages a reflection on the ways in which the logics of western visual economies shape our encounters with black women’s bodies. 

If you have digital or paper material that may be of value to this project please contact me.

Image citations in order of appearance: 

Straight Stuntin Magazine. Detail of Auralynn Rosario’s centerfold. 2008 Special New Year’s Edition, 2000 – 2018. Auralynn Rosario Collection, New York City.

Temar France, Portrait of Auralynn Rosario. April. 7 2018. In Living Color Series, 2018.

Straight Stuntin Magazine. Magazine cover. 2008 Special New Year’s Edition, 2000 – 2018. Auralynn Rosario Collection, New York City.

Straight Stuntin Magazine. Magazine back cover. 2008 Special New Year’s Edition, 2000 – 2018. Auralynn Rosario Collection, New York City.

Johnson Publishing Company. Jet magazine Cover, 19 May 2008.

Johnson Publishing Company. Jet magazine Cover, 2 October 1976.

Johnson Publishing Company. “Beauty of the Week”, Joyce Johnson, 2 October 1976.

Johnson Publishing Company. Jet magazine Cover, 5 February 1976.

Johnson Publishing Company. Jet magazine Cover, 15 September 1955.

Johnson Publishing Company. Emmett Till Article, 15 September 1955.

Vieilles Annonces, Screenshot of 1954 Black History Viewed Through Magazines, Flickr

Straight Stuntin Magazine. Detail of Auralynn Rosario’s centerfold Interview. 2008 Special New Year’s Edition, 2000 – 2018. Auralynn Rosario Collection, New York City.

Council, Pamela. Screenshot of Retweet to Temar France, 4 April 2018. @PamelaCouncil, 2009-2018. Twitter.

Thomas, Tiffany, Screenshot of Tweet, 4 April 2018. @theartbxtch, 2013-2018, Twitter

Thomas, Tiffany, Screenshot of September 1965 cover of Hep Magazine, 4 April 2018. @theartbxtch, 2013-2018, Twitter

Thomas, Tiffany, Screenshot of February 1962 cover of Jive Magazine, 4 April 2018. @theartbxtch, 2013-2018, Twitter

Thomas, Tiffany, Screenshot of January 1977 cover of Bronze Thrills Magazine, 4 April 2018. @theartbxtch, 2013-2018, Twitter

Thomas, Tiffany, Screenshot of April 1965 cover of Hep Magazine, 4 April 2018. @theartbxtch, 2013-2018, Twitter

Vieilles Annonces, Screenshot of May 1957 Cover of Brown Magazine, 1954 Black History Viewed Through Magazines album, Flickr

Vieilles Annonces, Screenshot of March 1954 Brown Magazine article, “Is Kinsey Prejudiced”, 1954 Black History Viewed Through Magazines, Flickr

Players Magazine, Screenshot of premiere 1973 cover, DTA Collectibles, Abebooks.com.

Players Magazine, Screenshot of 1979 cover, Illustrated, MAG, Amazon.com.

Players Magazine, Screenshot of 1978 cover, Magazine Back Issues, ebay.com.

Brooks, Daphne. Screenshot of Bodies in Dissent: Spectacular Performances of Race and Freedom, 1850-1910 cover, 2006. Duke University Press.

BlackMen Magazine. Image of Nov/Dec 2004 cover ft. Melyssa Ford, 2000 – 2018. Auralynn Rosario Collection, New York City.

King Magazine. Image of December 2005 cover ft. Trina, 2000 – 2018. Auralynn Rosario Collection, New York City.

Hottie Magazine. Image of premiere issue cover (ca. 2001) ft. Nicole Ricca, 2000 – 2018. Auralynn Rosario Collection, New York City.

Hottie Magazine. Image of Nicole Ricca interview (ca. 2001), 2000 – 2018. Auralynn Rosario Collection, New York City.

Hottie Magazine. Image of Hottie Squad (ca. 2001), 2000 – 2018. Auralynn Rosario Collection, New York City.

Newmanology. Screenshot of Black History Month Magazines: Sepia, Jive, Hep, Bronze Thrills album, Facebook

Miller-Young, Mireille. Screenshot of A Taste for Brown Sugar: Black Women in Pornography cover, 30 October 2014. Duke University Press.

Newmanology. Screenshot of February 1967 Cover of Jive Magazine, Facebook

Film Bibliography:

(5) Newmanology – Photos. https://www.facebook.com/newmanology/photos/a.10151325855960849.450599.199718485848/10151325856460849/?type=3&theater. Accessed 1 May 2018.

(23) Newmanology – Photos. https://www.facebook.com/pg/newmanology/photos/?tab=album&album_id=10151325855960849. Accessed 30 Apr. 2018.

1954 Black History Viewed Through Magazines | Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/vieilles_annonces/albums/72157602215799625. Accessed 1 May 2018.

Annonces, Vieilles. Glamorama Queen – Brown Magazine, May, 1954. 23 Mar. 2008, https://www.flickr.com/photos/vieilles_annonces/3690420416/.

—. Is Kinsey Prejudiced – Brown Magazine, March, 1954. 4 July 2009, https://www.flickr.com/photos/vieilles_annonces/3688347657/.

Brooks, Daphne. Bodies in Dissent: Spectacular Performances of Race and Freedom, 1850-1910. Duke University Press, 2006.

Company, Johnson Publishing. Jet. Johnson Publishing Company, 2008.

—. Jet. Johnson Publishing Company, 1975, https://books.google.com/books?id=ZEIDAAAAMBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false.

—. Jet. Johnson Publishing Company, 1976, https://books.google.com/books?id=i8ADAAAAMBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false.

—. Jet. Johnson Publishing Company, 1955, https://books.google.com/books?id=57EDAAAAMBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false.

COUNCIL ⭐ 🐐, ⭐ 💅🏽PAMELA. “Wow i Could Get into These…. @etmafrance Check These out for Your Researchhttps://Twitter.Com/Theartbxtch/Status/981615264474320897 ….” @PamelaCouncil, 4 Apr. 2018, https://twitter.com/PamelaCouncil/status/981674213055651840.

Gifford, Justin D. “‘Harvard in Hell’: Holloway House Publishing Company, Players Magazine, and the Invention of Black Mass-Market Erotica: Interviews with Wanda Coleman and Emory ‘Butch’ Holmes II.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 35, no. 4, 2010, pp. 111–37, https://muse.jhu.edu/article/407339.

ILLUSTRATED, MAG. VINTAGE PLAYERS MAGAZINE V6N3 AUGUST 1979 BEAUTIFUL EBONY WOMEN PICTORIALS. 1st edition, See Title, 1979.

Lee, Trymaine. “The Rise And Fall Of KING Magazine.” Huffington Post, 8 Aug. 2011, https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/08/08/the-rise-and-fall-of-king_n_917909.html.

Miller-Young, Mireille. A Taste for Brown Sugar: Black Women in Pornography. Duke University Press, 2014.

Ogunnaike, Lola. “New Magazines for Black Men Proudly Redefine the Pinup.” The New York Times, 31 Aug. 2004, https://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/31/arts/new-magazines-for-black-men-proudly-redefine-the-pinup.html.

Players Magazine #1 1973- Playboy Type Magazine Black Interest High Grade: – DTA Collectibles. https://www.abebooks.com/Players-Magazine-1973–Playboy-type-Black/22385790547/bd. Accessed 1 May 2018.

PLAYERS V5/N4 1978 Travel: RIO SCOEY, MITCHELL Talks, RON VOGEL Photography. https://www.ebay.com/itm/PLAYERS-V5-N4-1978-Travel-RIO-SCOEY-MITCHELL-talks-RON-VOGEL-photography-/231274113032. Accessed 1 May 2018.

Please do not reproduce any of the content on this site without the expressed written consent of Temar France.

In Living Color

From the In Living Color exhibition in 2018:

“This is a project of encounter. An attempt. A recognition of the subjectivities that shape a human life. The subjects photographed for this exhibition were asked to reply to the questions, “How do you live?” and “What do you see?”, in response to seeing their portraits. The purpose in including their answers in the show was to offer a measure of authorship in an experience that too often strips away the subjective experience of those being photographed. The varied responses reflect the complexity of subjective experiences and identities, that are often erased under the umbrella term, “people of color”. Although one’s experience as a non-white student can impact their Smith College experience, one’s perceived race, does not necessarily define how one engages with their identity or how one lives in the world. In living Color is a reflection of the quotidien – the everydayness of life captured in a singular moment. By posing the questions above we are asking how one cultivates a natural life in an unnatural environment.


Unnatural because this institution was not built for “people of color”.


Unnatural because we are living in the margins.


Unnatural because we are expected to do the extraordinary everyday.


We are whole individuals rather than people whose race eclipses every aspect of our very ordinary and sometimes mundane lives. There are no pillars of strength or wilting flowers in this exhibition, yet how could we know? There is only what is seen and can never be known.” – Camille Bacon